Canada illustrates the danger of ‘emergency’ laws

Fifty years after Canada’s most recent police state imposition, two academics warn about the repressive history of laws brought in to cope with ‘emergencies’. Citizens must not give governments powers that are certain to be abused by later suspension of civil liberties, police crackdowns and, with today’s and tomorrow’s technology, electronic Big Brother surveillance.

May 2020 CLArion newsletter: Trust emerges as even stronger factor in which politicians and parties we’re prepared to put our faith in next time around

With the immediate emergency fading, thoughts turn to what we need restoring first: personal freedoms (our civil liberties) back is No 1, just to walk on a beach, take a drive, go interstate. Then comes democracy: parliaments sitting again to schedule. We need to learn the lessons of this time for for next time. Is the ‘National Cabinet’ appropriate? Is it just PR spin and collective avoidance of responsibility? It’s not constitutional, so entrenching an NC means legislating in every parliament. That would open a bag of states’ rights and responsibilities worms sure to engender passionate debate about whether we can trust politicians to not dispense arbitrarily with our freedoms at a moment’s notice…like this time around.

Former spook insider Wilkie tells PM ’No’ to app download

Probably the most knowledgeable federal parliamentarian on security issues, Andrew Wilkie, has made it crystal clear why he won’t be rushing to download the Corvid-19 app. Basically, he doesn’t trust the government or its cyber spooks. The former Army officer resigned as an intelligent analyst from Australia’s Office of National Assessments over misinformation given out by then-PM John Howard on Iraq’s supposed weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

Asylum seekers, refugees and Covid-19: most vulnerable, most exposed?

Vulnerable refugee claimants are at greater risk of catching Covid-19 illness because of where they are housed, and general poor nutrition and ill-health because of their poverty. Without incomes as the economy grinds to a halt, their plight is worsening. Meanwhile the Australian government appears to have a policy of deliberating slowing down their ‘day in court’ by appointing the wrong people to the main tribunal that hears refugee claims. CLA Director Jennifer Ashton tells the story.

Fencing off the House of Ghosts

Currently ghostly and almost unused due to Covid-19, trod by very few feet other than the police and security guards, Australia’s Parliament House is still fenced off from the people. This enclosed community, preventing overall access by the citizens of the nation, is against every principle on which the parliament chose the design after a mammoth, worldwide architectural competition. Tony Murney investigates…or tries to!