COVID-19 stats: the good, the bad and the ugly ‘data’

So, people are sick, and dying. But what is the hard comparative data? Why are our governments not sharing with us the figuring that lies behind their thinking. Here metrologist (measurement guru) and risk expert John W. Clark puts the comparative statistics under the microscope. You be the judge of whether our governments should be revealing more facts, and consulting with us much more about life-and-death decisions for people, economies and nations.

COVID-19: Risk management or risk aversion?

Experts are puzzled why only health professionals appear to be advising senior politicians over Covid-19 problems. Noted by their absence are risk advisors. In a national crisis, governments should involve risk professionals accustomed to analysing, evaluating, ignoring ’noise’ and applying a structured, disciplined approach to crucial decisions which will affect Australia for decades to come.

Releasing non-violent inmates could reduce COVID spread potential

As Iran releases 100,000 prisoners, Australian jails are still packed with the potential for major COVID-19 spread into the community, Paul Gregoire writes for Sydney Criminal Lawyers. And, as usual, Indigenous prisoners are relatively most at risk because of their large numbers and poor health. The WHO and UN have warned Australia about the potential for jails to spread the pandemic. ‘Prison health is a matter of public health’.

Does the COVID-19 pandemic response measure up to our rights and liberties?

Difficult questions are starting to arise around the human rights implications of the Covid-19 pandemic in Australia. The delicate balancing act between minimising harm and infringing on liberties is occurring in a way many of us have not experienced before, legal bioethicist Caitlin Davis says as she explores the issues.

Prisoners and quarantined must have their health safeguarded

Prisoners are worried, very worried. Locked away, often two to a cell, they are more prone to a contagious virus than just about any sector of society. Governments have a responsibility to take special efforts to protect their health. And governments are also responsible for ensuring that any quarantined group, including arrivals from flights or cruises, are also looked after according to the OPCAT treaty standards that Australia and every state and territory government has signed up to.

Crisis causes power to aggregate centrally

As the virus crisis bites deeper into daily life, more people are starting to question what freedoms and liberties we are giving up at the behest of an ever-shrinking ‘executive’ ruling group, comprising a hotch-potch of people from MPs to mining bosses and public servants with interesting track records. CLA member Carolyn van Langenberg airs some opinions alternate to the mainstream groupthink.

Good, bad, ugly of ‘treating’ mental illness revealed

A new book revealing the doings inside a now-closed ‘mental asylum’ is an important contribution to civil liberties and human rights. It is a timely reminded – as a health panic starts to threaten more government abuse – that it is vital to keep shining torches into those places that authorities would prefer are forgotten. Review by Reg. Murray.

Let prisoners escape Covid-19 virus

Other nations are already showing Australia the way on how to mass deaths in prisons: they are letting lower-range and particular prisoners free, at least for the duration of the world health emergency. It’s time the Australian states and territories did something similar…and took the opportunity to remove from prison some people who probably should not be there, CLA says.