July 2008 CLArion Newsletter

Treaties Committee adopts CLA’s proposals:
*  New AFP rules may prevent ‘Bali 9’ situations
*  Extradition outcomes ‘should be monitored

CLA expects the charter of rights and responsibilities debate to get under way in coming weeks: a steering committee will help drive the ‘Yes’ case with consistent messaging. There’s hope for improvements in Queensland and national Freedom Of Information laws, but worrying developments over a range of privacy, data and information issues in Australia and internationally. Read these articles and much more …

As well, the Rudd Government is producing patchy outcomes in the fields of civil liberties and human rights.

The Joint Standing Committee on Treaties has endorsed CLA submissions and recommended significant changes to Australian Federal Police guidelines (so the AFP cannot put Australians at risk of the death penalty overseas) and to extradition procedures (so that Australia follows up on the health and well-being of extradited people, and on the outcome of their cases).

Other items featured in this month’s CLArion include:

  • Top end cops radio for help;
  • Parliament watchdog uneasy over DNA law expanding;
  • Defence by name and nature, ex-legal chief says;
  • Personal fraud in Australia reaches $1bn annually;
  • Govt signals it will leave smart cards to others;
  • Liberals table new Bill for terror law reviewer;
  • Damages payout provides salutary lesson to police;
  • Worrying anti-media trends emerge: Fiji, Sri Lanka;
  • Canadian watchdog threatens to ban stun guns;
  • Muslim seminary issues fatwa against terrorism;
  • Law Lords throw out secret evidence; and
  • Court sex gains reprieve for death row prisoner.
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