March 2016 newsletter: Electoral fiddling set to benefit established parties more

CLA CLArion Monthly newsletter

The Australian Parliament will make sure any changes to Senate voting rules advantage big parties over small. It’s not immediately obvious how changes of that type would benefit Australian democracy. There a crying need for electors to be better educated about how they can make smarter voting choices, and exercise real power to rid the nation of underperforming political puppets and apparatchiks.

Elsewhere, Victoria looks set to lead the way to a treaty with Indigenous people, creating a rush of ‘me too’ activity from the other states and territories, and possibly even stirring the federal government into action.

With equal treatment for gays a hot plebiscite issue, the last thing Australia needs is to wind back discrimination laws so that anti-gay minority interests can have an open slather, discrimination-law-free period to peddle bigotry and hatred. Churches should operate on a level playing field, not constantly seek to slant society so the tilt is permanently in their favour.

Other items include:

  • Border Force to become a stunning agency
  • US should not interfere with the ‘right to keep and bear Apples’
  • Innocence projects come to the fore in Australia
  • Are today’s MPs a shadow of those of the past?
  • Chief justices move to corral expert witness excesses
  • Right to report wrong is stolen from journalists by government
  • Unfair drug testing system thrown out of court
  • Neill-Fraser team lodges appeal after CLA achieves law change
  • Exonerations in USA running at three a week
  • 92yo ex-Army chief criticises police for reversing burden of proof
  • The judge was a shocker

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