Federal priorities post-election: Dr Des Griffin

What should the incoming Australian government set as priorities for the 2022-2025 parliamentary term? You can read about what CLA believes priorities should be in the CLArion MAY 2022 (see below), or here –in response to those priorities – is what noted museum and education expert Dr Des Griffin AM proposes as early-term ‘must-dos’ for whomever forms government.

CLArion May 2022: What should be the new govt’s priorities?

It should be up to We The People to set priorities for a new federal government’s early actions, not political parties. Here’s a list of issues that need urgent attention from CLA’s viewpoint (you can bet mining and farming and fracking/gas and mining and coal industries don’t need to be on any priority list for assistance!). Meanwhile, in the West, CLA will launch a hard-hitting documentary early this month: in it, real people tell real-life stories of justice and legal system failure. Also, in this issue is a litany of neglect, ignorance, lack of caring and failure to allocate appropriate funding to juveniles: these are unconscionable ’state crimes’ against children in one of the world’s richest societies. Plus…

  • Integrity and trust make society better, save lives, during C-19
  • Long-awaited corruption commission promised in 2022
  • Australia may lose its human rights status
  • Murder is murder, whether by Russian or Australian troops
  • Rule of law vital says ex-AG…but did he and others live up to it?
  • Cashing in on the power to reward supporters
  • A peck with the beak means the ’sack’ for the lass
  • End all-white juries, rally says
  • Barristers to ’strike’ in England
  • Prisoners: as they reap, so shall they sow
  • Photo ID voted down by Lords
  • Divorce refusal leads to jail

Click for one column CLArion

Click for two-column CLArion

Police chiefs won’t accept responsibility

A worldwide problem – police not accepting responsibility for incompetence in evidence gathering and prosecutions, poor leadership, and an inability to change with the times, particularly in relation to domestic violence – is evidenced by the resignation letter of London Met Commissioner, Dame Cressida Dick. Australian police chiefs too should be held to account for what happens, or the change that doesn’t happen, in their forces.

CLArion April 2022: Parliament powerless over Covid-19 rules

Australia’s governance system allows Ministers to impose over-the-top rules and regulations without Parliament able to have a say. The system should be changed, CLA says. In this issue, we report on the new ‘Right To Appeal’ laws in three states – they have not opened any floodgates: many wrongfully convicted people still languish in our jails. And we note that lawyer David McBride, the alleged whistleblower, is the only person so far charged over alleged murders and assaults on Afghan nationals by members of the ADF's SAS, despite four years of initial investigation and now a further 18-month (and counting) second internal inquiry.

Medical treatment is child abuse, says Texas

The chair of Republican Governors of the USA, Texas Governor Greg Abbott, has ordered his Family and Protective Services Department to investigate parents who get medical treatment for their children, and told other state agencies to pry into health facilities who provide the services. His target: children and their parents facing gender identity health issues. The fascist order is a foretaste of what a future American society might look like if an extremist is elected President in 2024.

CLArion March 2022: No Rights Without Remedies needed

CLA is working hard behind the scenes to encourage a new approach to Human Rights Acts, federally and in the states and territories. The aim is to ensure that all such Acts in future contain simple, easy, quick and cheap access to a remedy – starting with a conciliation process, through a tribunal to a senior court if necessary – for people to have their rights enforced against political and bureaucratic decisions. An inquiry in the ACT will soon consider the issues in detail.

Backgrounder: why Australia needs a CCRC

Australia needs a Criminal Cases Review Commission system. Proven over 25 years in Britain, a CCRC can correct wrongful convictions like those of the Guildford 4 and the Birmingham 6 (Photo: two of those victims, with Australian wrongful conviction guru Estelle Blackburn). With an Australian CCRC system, the cases of Sue Neill-Fraser and Derek Bromley – now before the High Court – would have evaluated for their possible erroneous forensics earlier than 13 and 37 years ago, respectively.