Australia: Are we a fascist state?

Is smoking worse than fascism? How do you measure and balance between different claims to society-harming activity? These are the issues Mark Jarratt – who chooses to smoke – explores in this article calling for the many to dispense with apathy and think about controlling what he sees as the real danger to Australian society, group-think engendered and controlled by a self-selected cadre of fervid crusaders for whom even the Turkey solution of the past might not be enough.

Children need to learn their 3Rs…and human rights

Students should learn about human rights, in schools and universities, as an integral part of their education, not necessarily only as a standalone subject, a major internatinal human rights conference heard recently.  More than 400 hundred human rights experts representing 50 countries  attended the 9th International Conference on Human Rights Education at Western Sydney University in November 2018. CLA member Sophie Bouris reports on the highlights.

SA AG rejects inquiry: says ‘handled case-by-case’

The South Australian Attorney-General and Deputy Premier, Vickie Chapman, has rejected CLA’s call for a full inquiry into about 400 criminal cases in the state over about 40 years that were corrupted by malfunctioning forensic science organisation and by the concomitant errors of police, prosecutors and the judicial system. Any issue would be handed on a “case-by-case” basis, she said. However, the problem in SA was systemic and deeply entrenched: it colours how justice operates in SA to this day because key actors of yesteryear have risen to prominent positions now.

Justice dies a ‘Death on the Derwent’

A former Tasmanian, and noted crime author, Robin Bowles brings a unique perspective to her skilfully crafted, disturbing and compelling new book on the Sue Neill-Fraser case. The third book on the wrongful conviction released in just six months, Bowles brings a different insight to the sorry saga, which is still being played out in the Tasmanian courts 10 years after Bob Chappell disappeared off a yacht, his body never found. All actors in this drama await judge Michael Brett’s imminent decision on whether the woman sentenced to 23 years jail will get another chance to appeal her innocence.

Tas AG rejects inquiry…instantly

“Our polite request to Attorney-General Elise Archer for the Tas Govt to consider holding a Royal Commission in 2020 or 2021 has been met with an emphatic ‘NO’ in record time, and on a long weekend,” CLA President Dr Kristine Klugman said. “You would think the government would be a little more circumspect, and wait until after legal cases had concluded to respond, as we suggested.

“Throughout Australia, governments unthinkingly backing their police and state legal systems have come completely unstuck over the past decade or so, and many Ministers have egg on their faces. I’m reminded of South Australian AG Michael Atkinson who for years repeatedly, inside and outside parliament, said the Henry Keogh conviction for murder was rock solid, safe, and a fine example of SA police, forensic and prosecution work. Keogh’s conviction was not long ago overturned by the SA Supreme Court after 19 years. SA has just paid Keogh $2.5m compensation.”

Re-birth of a nation: creating Australia anew

Australia’s first birth was premature. We held a big party, but didn’t invite the people who should have been first on the list. Now, as we debate which day to celebrate our anniversary, we have a chance for a re-birthing Constitution that will create a new Australia with everyone sharing equally. Then we can all come to the party on Australia Day, the day we formally pass the new, foundational law. Christian J. Bennett writes.

February 2019: Let’s think about positively improving Australia, and ignore negative election campaigning

CLA CLArion Monthly newsletterWe’re looking for positive ideas to throw into the mix around the upcoming federal election. A Bill of Rights is one big issue, but what other ideas and suggestions should CLA be putting forward? A national Crimes Act, married to national courts and a Criminal Cases Review Commission to catch any mistakes? Please send us your ideas. So far in 2019, CLA has ruffled some feathers: we hope to keep doing so all year. Plus, the long-running Sue Neill-Fraser case in Tasmania is coming to a crunch moment in the first week of February.

Also in this issue:

  • Our democratic details are being sold for profit
  • Treasury wants more secret powers, to reverse law of proof
  • Go figure! How organised crime profit is rising alarmingly
  • Ramping up fear escalates violence: an oldie but a goodie
  • Royal Commission to referee police/prosecutor warfare
  • FOI: underfunding and active blocking cut people’s access
  • Qld: beautiful one day, naughty the next
  • Let half the prisoners out of jails: Minister
  • Trump makes American lawyers greatly profitable again

Click for SINGLE COLUMN (read on screen)
Click for 2-COLUMN (print, read over a break)

Does perverted justice prevail in Australia’s deep south?

Witness coercion. Unjustified secret surveillance. Proven incompetence. Corruption by confirmation bias, Standover tactics. Bending laws to their own ends… and that’s just the local police! ‘Southern Justice’, a new book by Colin McLaren, exposes and details how justice has gone rogue in Tasmania, where 60-something grandmother Sue Neill-Fraser languishes in her 10th year in Risdon jail, of 23 to serve, for a crime she didn’t commit. It’s a cracking read! Review by CEO CLA Bill Rowlings.